Guide Posts of Strength
Click any sign on the guide post to read Key Information.Hair Stylist
Pam Campbell
3’s Company Salon, High Point, NC

During her four decades as a stylist, a salon owner and a confidant of her customers, Pam Campbell has walked the cancer journey with countless clients. In fact, she even spent eight years volunteering with the American Cancer Society as a Look Good Feel Better instructor.

No doubt about it, losing your hair is one of the biggest and most dreaded side effects of chemotherapy. Pam knows a lot about how to maneuver through this big bump in the road.

Key Information about Hair, Skin and Nail Care:

If you have a regular hair stylist, let him or her know that you’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Even if you aren’t going to have chemotherapy, your hair stylist needs to make sure that your hair products are right for you during treatment. After all, your skin – and that includes your scalp – may be more sensitive than usual.

Sign up for the American Cancer Society’s “Look Good Feel Better” class. It’s offered on a regular basis but you must register at least a week before the class. It’s pampering you deserve!

Hair Loss

If you are going to be treated with a chemotherapy regimen that will make your hair fall out, tell your stylist. He or she can help you through this process. How?

  • First of all, your stylist can help you find a wig that looks similar to your own hairstyle and can help you select the proper size too.
  • If you have long hair, you may want to change to a shorter style as you begin treatment. Hair loss is messy and distressing and you may feel better with a new “do” – even if it is temporary.
  • Once your hair starts to shed, talk with your hair stylist about shaving your hair before it all falls out. That way YOU — not the chemo – decide when you lose your hair.
  • Once you are ready to have your head shaved, be sure to ask your stylist for a “private” cut. Most stylists will be able to shave your hair after hours or in a private area of the salon.
  • Be sure to take your wig with you when you have your head shaved. Your stylist can show you how to put on the wig, style it and care for it. You may even want your stylist to trim your wig so that it looks just right on you.

What most people don’t realize is that your hair follicles become very tender when your hair starts to fall out. In fact, your entire scalp may be sore. Applying an over-the-counter cortisone cream to your scalp actually can help ease this soreness.

When your hair starts to grow back, it is often a different texture than it was before chemotherapy. Some people have very fine or very curly hair after chemotherapy; others find their hair returns a different color. Most of these changes will be temporary.

Nails & Skin

Be sure to also ask your stylist for tips about nail care, makeup and skin care during chemotherapy. A good stylist will be happy to listen to your concerns and point you in the right direction.

Don’t have manicures and pedicures during chemotherapy. Your skin is too sensitive and your risk of infection is too high so save the pampering until after you have finished chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy can damage your nails so do not clip your nails while you are undergoing treatment. Instead use a nail file to shape or shorten your nails. Filing your nails also helps you reduce your risk of infection.

Ask your stylist, your doctor or other cancer patients for recommendations of lotions and creams to sooth dry, cracked skin.

Links / Apps

Look Good…Feel Better — Sign Up for a Session.

Paula Young — For affordable wigs.

Headcovers Unlimited — For scarf tying tips, make up tips, etc.

Key Info Hair Loss Nails and Skin Links and Apps

 

Key information

If you have a regular hair stylist, let him or her know that you’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Even if you aren’t going to have chemotherapy, your hair stylist needs to make sure that your hair products are right for you during treatment. After all, your skin – and that includes your scalp – may be more sensitive than usual.

Sign up for the American Cancer Society’s “Look Good Feel Better” class. It’s offered on a regular basis but you must register at least a week before the class. It’s pampering you deserve!

Hair Loss

If you are going to be treated with a chemotherapy regimen that will make your hair fall out, tell your stylist. He or she can help you through this process. How?

  • First of all, your stylist can help you find a wig that looks similar to your own hairstyle and can help you select the proper size too.
  • If you have long hair, you may want to change to a shorter style as you begin treatment. Hair loss is messy and distressing and you may feel better with a new “do” – even if it is temporary.
  • Once your hair starts to shed, talk with your hair stylist about shaving your hair before it all falls out. That way YOU — not the chemo – decide when you lose your hair.
  • Once you are ready to have your head shaved, be sure to ask your stylist for a “private” cut. Most stylists will be able to shave your hair after hours or in a private area of the salon.
  • Be sure to take your wig with you when you have your head shaved. Your stylist can show you how to put on the wig, style it and care for it. You may even want your stylist to trim your wig so that it looks just right on you.

What most people don’t realize is that your hair follicles become very tender when your hair starts to fall out. In fact, your entire scalp may be sore. Applying an over-the-counter cortisone cream to your scalp actually can help ease this soreness.

When your hair starts to grow back, it is often a different texture than it was before chemotherapy. Some people have very fine or very curly hair after chemotherapy; others find their hair returns a different color. Most of these changes will be temporary.

Nails and Skin

Be sure to also ask your stylist for tips about nail care, makeup and skin care during chemotherapy. A good stylist will be happy to listen to your concerns and point you in the right direction.

Don’t have manicures and pedicures during chemotherapy. Your skin is too sensitive and your risk of infection is too high so save the pampering until after you have finished chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy can damage your nails so do not clip your nails while you are undergoing treatment. Instead use a nail file to shape or shorten your nails. Filing your nails also helps you reduce your risk of infection.

Ask your stylist, your doctor or other cancer patients for recommendations of lotions and creams to sooth dry, cracked skin.

Links / Apps

Look Good…Feel Better — Sign Up for a Session.

Paula Young — For affordable wigs.

Headcovers Unlimited — For scarf tying tips, make up tips, etc.

 


Guide Posts of Strength